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Beer thread is the standard threading used on commercial Sanke keg couplers and beer faucet shanks. It is commonly measured as 7/8"-14 or 29/32"-14 in the U.S. and 5/8" BSP in Europe and other parts of the world. Although the difference in measurement can be quite confusing, you...
There are approximatly 165 cans (12oz) beers in a standard 15.5 gallon keg.  This is assuming 100% of the beer gets dispense with zero loss, reality with foam and such is most people estimate 150 Twelve ounce pours when working with a regular full sized keg. 5 Gallon homebrew kegs...
  A hydrometer is a specific gravity density meter, typically a floating glass piece to get specific gravity readings of your wort/beer to tell you your progress of the fermentation. A refractometer serves a similar purpose measuring the refractive index.    A...
Yes. The wire glass rack/holder comes standard on all kegerators but will need to be removed to fit 3 kegs.  It is a quick job and then you can install the glass rack in another close location in your bar or brew room.  
The cooling tube, which originates at the fan inside the unit, snakes up the tower to keep it cold. Simply push it up the tower and it will stay in place with no clips or hooks necessary.
Clean the TrübTrapper prior to use. Place the TrübTrapper in the bottom center of your boil kettle before you fill it so the silicone gasket is in full contact with the kettle bottom and your dip tube is outside the ring. Trub is retained inside the ring, wort is collected from...
Yes, you are correct!  We somehow convinced our President Chris Graham to suit up for this shot.  We love our job! 
Stainless steel itself shouldn't rust, you are right there.  Especially a high grade 304 Ss like we use on all of our products.  But what can rust are surface particles of iron that are sometimes left residual from the manufacturing process and the tools used to grind and polish...
We would not hesitate to use these for wine storage for 6 months, give or take depending on the kind of wine and the size of the tank (more on that later). Speidels are made from thick HDPE, the same material as Flextanks are made from. For those not familiar with Flextanks these are similar...
Yes!  The difference in growth rate between California and Engilsh is pretty minimal so doing a starter won't change the population ratio.  
Yes you can, however repitching multiple times may promote a higher percentage of English yeast cells.  This is mainly because English is more flocculent so more of it will be at the bottom for collection (assuming you use a conical fermentor).  With a carboy, or other flat bottom...
Yes! That's the art side of personal brewing. Creative brewers may combine strains to achieve unique new, personalized flavor profiles. Experimenting is a natural step in the process of crafting one's own series of Signature Beers. For example, a mellow-tasting Hefeweizen can be...
Q:   I’m trying to achieve a rich, malty aroma in my beers that rivals that of such beers as Ayinger Maibock, Pilsner Urquell, and Anchor Steam. I know decoction works well, bur is there an easier way to come close? Different types of malt, perhaps? Different types of yeast?...
Halting Fermentation at a Specific Gravity   Q: Thanks for your feedback on “soured beer” and Guinness (5,6). My question of the day is: How do you stop fermentation at a specific gravity? The reason I ask is that the good people at Hale’s Ales (Kirkland and...
Head Retention Problems   Q: I make my usual Scottish mild from a 1.6-kilogram can of lightly hopped malt extract syrup mixed with ¾ kilogram of dark dry malt and just less than 1 kilogram of corn sugar. I prime with 1¼ cups of corn sugar per 5-gallon batch before...
Turning a Fridge into a Walk-in Cooler   Q: I have a chest-type freezer that works well for lagering. It gives me little space, however, for lagering and controlled fermentation year round. Can I turn a currently serviceable refrigerator/freezer into a small “walk in”...
Often times the airlock will slow down and brewers will assume the fermentation is completed.  The airlock is a good indicator, however is not the best method of knowing that fermentation is completely finished.  If you suspect your beer is done, it is best to double check with a...
Sparge Temperature Q: Which is more critical when sparging: the temperature of the mash or the temperature of the sparge water? Could I use 185 °F (85 °C) sparge water if the mash temperature stays below 168 °F (76 °C)? A: The critical thing is the temperature of the...
RECORDKEEPING Q: What records should we keep of our brewing activities? Can you recommend a good format? A: Record each beer recipe and all measurements associated with the brew, such as the volume and strike temperature of the mash water, mash temperatures at the various times and...
Metallic tastes in beers   Q: I’ve had some trouble with a metallic taste in my beers. I use a stainless steel keg converted to a brew kettle. It’s very nice, but I find I have to scrub the stuffing out of it to get rid of all the baked-on crud. Could this be causing...
Stuck Mashes   Q: My latest home brewing session resulted in a stuck mash. I had 15 lb of grist in a Thermos picnic cooler with a false bottom. I had to scoop out most of the grist to get the flow going. I’m sure the batch will be badly oxidized. What can I do to reduce the...
If your draft faucet is stuck, first disconnect the keg from the beer line. Then remove the faucet from the shank or tower.  Mix a small solution of PBW or BLC and hot water (approximately 140F), and let the faucet soak in for 30 minutes. Wearing rubber dish gloves remove the faucet and...
Often times the fittings on a regulator or gas manifold are 5/16" but homebrew quick disconnects are 1/4".  This happens because industry standard in beer dispensing is 5/16" and industry standard in the soda industry (which is where kegs and keg qd's come from) is...
  Pretty much all homebrewing kettles, and all the kettles sold by MoreBeer!, are now made of Stainless Steel.  The price of stainless steel has come down in price over the last 10 years to a point where Enamel Coated, Aluminum, or any other type of kettle need not even be...
When the needle reads half way in the red you are about 10% full. You should be able to push approximately another 5 gallons of beer when you're at this level of remaining gas.
I can see my beer fermenting, but there are no bubbles in the airlock - why? Inspeck the airlock for a crack in the stem of the airlock. If that is not the problem make sure that stopper or the lid on your container is seated properly.  Bucket lids are particularly problematic to...
Ultimately, the quantity of fruit used will depend on the flavor you are looking for.  As a starting point we recommend using two pounds per 5 gallons.  Cut up the fresh fruit, remove any pits and place in the freezer.  Freezing helps extract more flavor and will also reduce any...
You have a few options here - try making a double-strength batch of coffee in your french press and adding that to your fermenter.  You can also try cold steeping coffee (letting the grounds steep in the fridge for 2 days).  Most brewers have had less-than-stellar results steeping...
  Yes!  Did you know there is zinc in copper?  Zinc is an essential nutrient source for yeast to consume as they grow and multiply.  The heat helps extract small amount of zinc found in copper. It's a win/win for your fermentation and for you as a brewer. ...
Store them in the freezer in their original oxygen barrier packaging.  If you open the hops try to remove all air from the bag and store hop bag in zip lock back in the freezer. Other ways to store hops such as using vacuum sealers or vacuum jars are great but require the purchase of...
Yes one of the reasons we love the Camp Cheff burner is the perfect height for gravity draining wort into a carboy or bucket for fermentation.   
Yes PET and PETE refer to the same material, Polyethylene Terephthalate. You can also check out the Wikipedia page for Polyethylene Terephthalate at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyethylene_terephthalate
We think it is actually better. While both are of great quality, this PET carboy is thicker and does not have ribs. The thicker walls could lead to less oxygen ingress (not proved) and not having ribs makes it easier to clean. Our PET Carboys are made by the Vintage Shop in Canada and they had...
As you browse through our MoreBeer! catalog and website, you'll discover that we offer the expert knowledge base and excellent Customer Service needed to help you from your first home beer making experience all the way into commercial beer brewing. Call us and speak directly with an expert...
Fill your hydrometer jar with water, preferably RO or distilled water.  Take a reading at a room temperature between 60-65F.  If you're hydrometer reads zero at the top of the miniscus water line you are still accurate. If your hydrometer is off by 1 to 2 points (and this is...
No, some yeast strains form a tight krausen like that - the beer is perfectly ok!  Take a sample, and if the beer is done (has reached approximately 25% of its starting gravity) your can proceed with racking it into your keg or bottling bucket. Don't worry about the krausen at...
Only 50% of the yeast cells will survive the rehydration process if added directly to wort.  Your beer will still ferment but there is a much higher chance for a stuck fermentation, high residulat gravity, and the flavors produced by the stressed yeast will not be as good.  We...
Transferring into bottles directly can be done, however most people prefer to go to a bottling bucket first, due to the ease of adding dissolved corn sugar. If you stir in the bottling sugar into the fermenter you will disturb this yeast bed and mix it back into the beer. This may or may not...
Brewer's follow their own unique schedules for dumping trub and yeast based on their style of beer made. Our general plan is to dump trub after the initial ferment has started to slow down. This removes a majority of the trub, the main item we are trying to eliminate. After a few days we...
Yes. During the warm summer months, the solubility of high gravity beers (1.060 ) is very low, so you will need to oxygenate a bit longer to achieve the same results.
This is a big question. We will try to cover it briefly here. There is a huge body of literature written on this subject both for homebrewing and professional brewing. Why add oxygen at all? Yeast has two metabolic pathways. The one it prefers is to eat sugar and O2 to make CO2 and water. This...
Oxygenation involves injecting the wort with 99% pure oxygen. Aeration involves injecting the wort with air, of which only 21% (by mole) is oxygen. Both obtain the same end result of supplying the yeast with oxygen. Aeration will take longer and if you are using a small fermenter foaming may...
Yeast consume oxygen during the aerobic replication process. The objective is to build strong cell membranes capable of withstanding higher alcohol contents, and also to build up metabolic energy used during later anaerobic fermentation. In oxygen-depleted wort conditions (zero oxygen), yeast...
The counter pressure bottle filler allows you to fill bottles with per-carbonated beer. It works like this: - You first carbonate the beer in the keg (important, do not over carbonate or you will have problems with foam.) - Then you set up the filler with equal pressure to the filler and the...
The colder the temperature, the lower the pressure you need to maintain carbonation. For example, a keg held at 35 degrees with 10psi of applied pressure will have the same carbonation rate as a keg held at 43 degrees with 15psi of applied pressure. To set your system up correctly, you need to...
The pads are sanitary until open, so no sanitizing is necessary. To sanitize the filter housing we submerse it in a bucket of sanitizer.
The pressure is not all that important - slower is generally better for quality. We recommend filtering at 4-6 psi for starters. You can judge the flow by sight and slow down or speed up as necessary. The actual pressure needed will vary with how the filter cartridge is handling the workload...
There are a few ways to answer this question as there are many variables. The 10" poly-spun filters are designed to be a one-time use and then discarded. With that in mind we usually recommend setting up to filter a few batches that day instead of the one. Depending on how much sediment...
To bottle your beer we will assume that your beer has gone through proper fermentation and is ready to bottle. First you need to prepare your bottling sugar. We recommend that you boil 4 oz of corn sugar (dextrose) with approximately two cups of water for 5 minutes at a low simmer. After...
We are going to assume that you are making an ale. Provided that you fermented your ale between a temperature of 62-75 degrees we are going to assume that fermentation will be done in two weeks. This is the case 99% of the time within the above temperature range. However it is an assumption...
Mashing is the process that converts the starch in the malt to sugar so the yeast can use the sugar as a food source. When barley is malted a variety of enzymes are created and each one has it's own temperature region that allows it to be active. A step mash holds the grist and a specific...
In a recirculation, your grain bed will set up and act as the main filter. The screen is there to support the grain but not act as the final filter. The small gap around the edge of the false bottom and the kettle gets clogged with grain quite quickly. Over the years we have had them made as...
You want to be mashing anywhere in the range of 146F to 156F. Mashing at lower temperatures yields more readily fermentable short-chain sugars and yields a drier beer. Higher temperature mashes yield beers with higher final gravities and more body. Mashing over 158F tends to yield beers that...
There are many different theories on water to grain ratio, but pretty commonly excepted is anywhere from .9 to 1.1 quarts of water per 1 pound of grain. With that in mind here is what we found. At 1.1 quarts of water per 1 pound of grain we were able to fit 28 lbs of grain with the ag403 false...
 We have designed our BrewSculptures to be used outdoors only. The burners will take up a lot of the oxygen in the air and leave you with none to breathe! Some BrewSculpture owners have had success in putting large, industrial vent hoods over their BrewSculptures, along with a large fan...
We ship our BrewSculptures on a pallet via freight trucks, due to their size. They are wrapped in bubble wrap and protected in a semi-ridged frame. You can see a picture of a palletized BrewSculpture under the base model's on our website. For example our: 1550 Tippy BrewSculpture Product...
Yes, there needs to be someone to inspect the shipment for damage, sign for it, and unload the truck. We can request that the delivery truck have a lift gate, but that is usually an extra charge. If you have a nice neighbor or a brew buddy, they might be able to help you take it off the truck...
The short answer - Both! You can use both pellets and whole at any stage of the brewing process with our BrewSculptures. If you use pellets, we recommend putting them into a fine mesh bag to contain as much of the pellet material as possible. If you plan on using whole hops, you can either use...
Yes, though some people are concerned with lead on the surface of the brass that is left over from machining.  Search for our tip on removing lead from brass. That being said, most brewers prefer to use stainless steel when they can.
Yes, in small amounts. The law sets limits for the lead content in brass fittings to be used in drinking water to 8%. In a normal water supply the calcium carbonate from the water will line the fitting after a few years and stop all leaching of this lead. In a brewery the acidity of wort and beer...
Yes, and it is very simple to do! The recipe is: 2 parts White vinegar 1 part Hydrogen peroxide. When the water turns blue after you have soaked the parts for 15 minutes. Remove them and rinse well. This only removes the lead from the surface. As the acidity of the wort dissolves the...
Yes! Our 20 gallon systems do indeed handle 10 gallon batches easily. Some BrewSculpture owners will choose to buy a 10 gallon boil kettle to better control evaporation rates during the boil.  
This is a fairly common issue, and one that is easily fixed. Much of it does depend on a few key points : 1 - That the pump is below the spigot level of the vessel you are pumping from, and that the tubing isn't excessively long below the spigot level. As these pumps are designed to push...
Reverse Osmosis strips all minerals from the water. This is not ideal for brewing since the yeast use some of the minerals for nutrients and the minerals provide a background flavor in many cases. If you get really sophisticated with your water you can start with RO and add minerals back. This...
There are two methods of pitching lager yeasts. Brewers use both methods with success, but each brewer tends to have a preferred approach. A) Starting Warm then Cool Down. This is the easiest method for the average homebrewer. Pitch yeast at 60-65F, reduce the wort temperature 10F per each 12...
Quick Answer: 4 Months Long Answer: Yeast is a living organism. As such, it needs to exist in certain conditions to survive. Dry yeast can stay alive for about one year, but yeast in liquid form-even though it's superior in taste and performance is more perishable. After 30 days in the...
While the quality of dry yeast has greatly increased in the last decade, pure liquid yeast strains predictably make the best beer. Here's why: Basically, it comes down to four major brewer benefits: 1) Extremely High Quality, 2) Extremely Large Selection, 3) Extremely Sterile...
Flocculation: This refers to yeast's tendency to clump together at the end of fermentation and drop to the bottom of the fermenter. Yeast strains are separated into three main degrees of flocculation: High, Medium, and Low. A yeast strain that has low flocculation will take a longer time...
Attenuation: The percentage of sugar that a yeast will be able to ferment. Low-attenuation yeast result in maltier beers. High-attentuation yeast results in drier, less sweet, beers.
About 1 years on a slant and 6-12 months on a plate before you have to redo your slant or plate. Yeast can be kept indefinitely but you have to 'transfer' them to new agar after awhile as agar will dry out with time.
Secondary fermentation on ales is something that a lot of people do because that is how most of the older homebrewing books taught people how to ferment. The theory was that you remove the yeast and trub from the ferment so that you have less flavor impact on the beer, and that less sediment...
This usually happens when the beer goes through temperature changes. The yeast stops fermenting when it gets cold as the metabolic activity of the yeast slows down. It then proceeds to start up again when the fermenter warms up. If your fermentation gets stuck warm up the beer to the desired...
We answer this question a lot because we don't mention the use of secondary fermenters in our instructions and other instructions do. First lets take a look at the supposed benefits of secondary fermenters. The first one we have always read was that the beer would clear out more in the...
Fermenting in a corny is the same as any other fermentation vessel with a couple of added issues. The first issue is the blow off. You can under fill a keg (3-4 gallons) and use a hose from the gas-in fitting to a bucket of water. The drawback to this method is the gas-in fitting is easily...
Your ferment will be very sluggish, as the activity of the yeast is halted by colder temperatures. The yeast eventually become dormant, stop fermenting, and drop to the bottom of the fermenter. To resume normal fermentation, heat the wort to the optimum temperature range and swirl it to mix...
If White Labs or Wyeast fermentation will begin 5-15 hours after pitching. As the yeast nears its 4 month shelf life fermentation will begin somewhat later, usually between 15-20 hours. The first sign of fermentation will be a raised airlock. This signals CO2 production. A fine layer of foam...
You will need to order the FE610A un-wired Ranco controller and wire it yourself. This only includes the controller itself and not the AC wire or the outlets. They are compatible with 120/240V and 50/60hz.
Filtering requires pressure to push the beer through a set of filter pads. Pressure can be achieved using CO2 to push the beer from one keg through a filter and into the next keg, or with the use of a diaphragm pump to push beer through a set of filter pads (though the later arrangement poses...
Most people use a pump to recirculate wort during mashing, to pump hot water during sparging, or to move hot wort from the boil through a counter-flow wort chiller.
When brewing extract it is not neccesary to adjust your brewing water - except for filtering tap water with a carbon filter prior to use.  With that said you can adjust your brewing water but this a more advanced step and usually reserved for those brewing all-grain, where there is...
Our first response to this questions is, "Are you fermenting in a plastic bucket?" 8 times out of 10 when we get this question the problem is that the lid is not securely fastened onto the top and the CO2 is coming out of the crack in the lid and not through the airlock. Our lid does...
A diacetyl rest is used when making lagers and ales. After a beer has fermented to near final gravity the beer is raised from fermenting temperature to a higher temperature roughly 3-4 degrees Fahrenheit above the original fermentation temperature and allowed to sit for two-four days. The...
First we need to know whether you are fermenting an ale or a lager. An ale will typically be best at a temperature of 62-72 degrees. Most ales excluding Belgians ferment cleaner beer at the lower end around 62-66F. A lager will typically ferment best between 48 to 54 degrees. Those are just...
In order to brew ales in hot weather and lagers in warm weather it is best to ferment in a consistent, temperature controlled environment. This can be achieved for very little money by acquiring a used refrigerator or freezer along with purchasing a Temperature Controller from MoreBeer!. How...
This is an advanced question and one which won't really affects us as homebrewers due to our limited type of fermenting vessels. Certain designs have effects on flavor. For example, a wide fermenter, such as those used by Samuel Smith, will cause more ester production due the amount of...
It depends on the yeast strain and temperature conditions, but you can expect fermentation with a lager to be done within four weeks. This is not a hard and fast rule. You may have fermentation that is done in as little as two weeks as well. We recommend a minimum primary fermentation at...
It depends on the ale yeast strain and temperature conditions, but you can expect fermentation with an ale to be done within two weeks. This is not a hard and fast rule. You may have fermentation that is done in as little as three to five days. Remember: Just because sugar has been consumed...
If you have waited two weeks for an ale, or four weeks for a lager, or you're just curious. Most veteran homebrewers will tell you the beer is done once the airlock stops bubbling but this isn't a sure thing that fermentation is complete. This is where a hydrometer is sometimes worth...
No! The acidity of the wort will dissolve iron into your wort causing off flavors and haze.
Conventional wisdom says no. Aluminum is dissolved in an acidic environment and will enter the wort. Most metals are scrubbed out by the yeast and we would expect aluminum would end up in the yeast and not the beer but, we know of no studies showing this to be true. To be safe, we would not...
Yes! Some brewers believe copper is the best material for brewing beer. It causes some interesting reactions to happen with the sugar that are believed to make the beer taste more like carmel. Also copper transfers heat very well. We have seen micro-photographs of the surface of a kettle just...
We don't recommend using fixed thermometers (weldless or weld in) on boil kettles that use immersion wort chillers to cool the wort. Most kettles aren't terribly wide, so they have a hard time accommodating a 2 or 6 inch probe and the wort chiller at the same time. Any damage to the...
The big problem is venting the exhaust gasses. You will either need a restaurant hood our build an enclosed burner like your hot water heater. A good plumbing text can teach you how to size the duct and make-up air vents. If you choose the hood, Make-up air is important to not suck flue gasses...
No! It is very dangerous to use propane in any place that does not drain to the outside. If you spray water in you brewery if there is any place it can puddle without flowing outside then you should not use propane. If there is any leaks it will puddle. Any pools of propane are extremely...
First find the scale that we as brewers use - which is the one that reads 1.000 at the top. Make sure there is no CO2 in solution! Do this by pouring the sample between two glasses untill there is no foaming. Slowly drop in the hydrometer and let it come to rest. Spin the hydrometer in the...
You are over carbonating the beer by doing it this way. A lot of old information suggests that by increasing the CO2 to high psi levels for a few days, this will result in faster carbonation . Which it does, but the main problem is that you tend to end up with excess foaming. The following are...
It sounds like you need to rebuild your regulator, which is very simple - the parts come in a small kit. To install the rebuild kit you'll need to disassemble the regulator. Changing out the interior requires the use of a vise clamp to hold the regulator down and in place, and a monkey...
All the CO2 cartridges we sell are all food grade cartridges. When CO2 cartridges are made there is oil used in the machining process. If the cartridges are steamed cleaned on the inside after construction they are considered food grade. The company that we buy from steam cleans all of their...
As for the regulator, you can go a couple of ways. The cheapest way is with a C02 "T", (D1860) The only problem here is that if you tap two kegs at different pressures, or release the pressure on one keg while the other is hooked up, your going to have beer flowing back up your gas...
No, not really. Most people store the CO2 tank inside the refrigerator. We will make a few notes: When a tank is placed in the refrigerator the pressure on your regulator will slightly drop because of the decrease in temperature and subsequent compression of the liquid inside the tank. Also,...
The co2 tank can go inside or outside the refrigerator. There are three things in the long run to consider when deciding where to put the co2 tank when making a kegerator. First, just a FYI that co2 is a liquid and we use the gas the comes off of the liquid. Since it is a gas, it will expand...
The question is whether it is better to ferment in a 6.5 gallon carboy or bucket where you have an airlock and there is no blow off versus fermenting in a 5 gallon carboy with a tube attached to the top of the carboy that goes into a jar of water that acts as a blowoff and airlock. With the...
One method is to use a section of 1/2" tubing and wedge it into the inside of a 3-piece airlock (you have to remove the plastic bubbler piece.) Another more popular method is to use an orange carboy cap and attach a section of 1/2" tubing. We have used both methods, never had a...
The beer is fine. When a ferment is going this wildly it is pushing off so much CO2 that no other microrganisms can fall in and contaminate it. Also, the yeast are replicating so fast that if any wild yeast or bacteria fell in most likely it would be consumed by the yeast. Take the airlock and...
There are usually a few contributing factors to a violent blow off of your airlock. First is the yeast selection. Certain yeast have a greater propensity to create a "big fluffy head". The yeast that are known for big head productions are White Labs Trappist, WLP300 Hefeweizen, and...
The advantages of a bucket is that it is very affordable and easy to use. The bucket fermenters that come with our kits have a spigot about 1" up from the bottom. The advantage of this is that it when it comes time to transfer one simply flips open the valve, effectively eliminating...
We often field this question at the last minute after a brewer realizes they don't have corn sugar. In a pinch, you can use other sugars to bottle with. We recommend, and use, corn sugar because it is easily digested by yeast which are already in a semi-dormant state. If you use another...
How much sugar you add depends upon the level of carbonation you desire. The amount can range from 3 to 6 oz (about .5 to 1.1 cups) for 5 gallons which will provide a level of carbonation ranging from very low to extremely high. While there are some traditional guidelines for how much...
Clarifying presents many issues when it comes to bottling. You have two ways to go about clarifying your beer. First is to work on anything that can help clear the beer out during the boil. This constitutes a good rolling boil (the entire volume of wort if possible) and use of a clarifying aid...
For most homebrewers a pressure set at 8-12PSI is the sweet spot. Your beer has to be stored cold from 34-40F for this pressure to work properly and you will need 5 feet of 3/16" ID line to serve the beer from. 
Pilsen water is the lowest in minerals of any water. First you would add a small amount of minerals to distilled or RO water as calculated by Promash brewing software. Then you would boil the water, let it cool and rack off the sediment. As soon as you rack off, reheat and start the brew. Just...
The yeast is the most important ingredient to refrigerate once you receive your order. Hops should be refrigerated after a couple days if they're left out at room temp. Hops can be frozen and will last for 2-3 years still preserving their freshness. Malt extract should be left at room...
All of our liquid malt extracts yield about 1.035 gravity points per pound of malt extract per gallon of water. For example if you used 5 lbs of extract in a 5 gallon batch it would yield a 1.035 starting gravity. Another way to think of it is that for each pound of liquid extract someone adds...
Quick answer, Yes. Long answer, No. When designing a recipe that is generic for 5 gallon batches, you have to take some liberties at guessing what style of boil the brewer practices. Based off of that, sometimes there is a fair amount of bittering hops used as partial boils (5 gallon kettle or...
All of our dry malt extracts yield approximately 1.045 gravity points per pound of malt per gallon of water. For Example: if you used 5lbs of extract in a 5 gallon batch it will yield a 1.045 specific gravity (SG). Another way to think of it is that for each pound of dry malt extract someone...
You want a positive sealing food grade container that will keep both bugs and moisture out. Our 6 gallon, food-grade buckets are a good solution to storing un-milled grain for 2-3 months. We recommend using a tup-a-wear container that has a rubber seal preventing any oxygen exposure.
1) Remove vial from refrigerator. Allow to warm to room temperature for at least 2 hours. 2) Recommended Process for Use of Flask: Double Boiler Method It is important for your safety to heat water in the flask with a heat source that distributes heat evenly. Our manufacturer has confirmed...
We build starters for 3 main reasons. First, to ensure yeast health. By making a starter 1-3 days in advance, you ensure that your yeast is healthy and strong and ready to do its job. Second, to create more yeast. By making the starter you will increase the cell count of the yeast, giving you...
Being that there are all kinds of recipes out there we often get asked how to change a recipe to match the way they currently brew. This can be fairly simple actually, but there are a few variables that change for each individual. You can look at the situation two ways, first, if you use...
This is an interesting experiment to do. One of our close friends did a test with raw raspberries and entered them into a competition to see what the results would be. He chose a fairly neutral beer to start with, we wish he did an American Wheat, but he chose a brown ale instead. He used the...
We provide malt analysis on our web page to give you an idea of the different values. We receive malt every week. Unfortunately, we cannot update the analysis to cover every batch. This would take using all of the previous malt before we brought new malt into the building to make sure we did...
YES!  If you can follow a recipe and keep clean, there is nothing stopping you from making great beer in your home - beer you can be proud of and your friends will love! The MoreBeer! mission is to provide reliable equipment and quality ingredients that make the home brewing...
Temperature control in one of these tanks is easy, the control will be based off of a small temperature controller (FE610, fe611, fe608) which regulates the power on either a heating or cooling device. For heating, fermwraps can be used on a small scale. Simply affix these small wraps to the...
First, a secondary fermenter is considered a fermenter, usually a carboy, that you transfer your beer into after the primary fermentation is finished. Usually only recommended by MoreBeer! when there is a reason to do so - you are fermenting with fruit and need to get the beer off the fruit,...
When is oxygen okay? Q:  I am somewhat confused about when it is okay to aerate your beer. I’ve heard that oxygen is important for fermentation, but racking to clarify beer can introduce unwanted air and expose beer to infection. What gives?   A: These questions...
Q: After fermenting my ale at 70 °F (21 °C), I racked it into the secondary and slowly cooled it down to 45 °F (7 °C) in a refrigerator. I am concerned that the yeast may be too dormant to carbonate when it is time to prime. Am I worrying for no reason, or should I look to...
Q: Someone I spoke with at a prominent malting company told me that I shouldn’t add my specialty grains at the beginning of the mash as I’m accustomed to doing. He says that I should only mash these grains for half an hour. Bur I find I get much better flavors and extract...
Q:   It’s been seven years since I started dispensing my homebrew with a Cornelius keg system, and I’ve never been happier until now. I just came across a tank of “the mix” (nitrogen/CO2) and an old Murphy’s faucet designed for dispensing with the mix. I...
Yes all MoreBeer! BrewSculptures now include our Ultimate Sparge Arm. In fact the BrewSculpture were the inspiration for this design. We've talked with customers at trade shows and during brew sessions and listened to feedback about what they wanted... easy adjustment, reduction of...
The stated volume of our Plastic Carboy fermenters is to the brim of the of the vessel. Often, with Glass Carboys, the stated volume is measured at the shoulder as opposed to the brim, and that is where the confusion can come from.
These crystals are from the storage solution changing from a liquid to a solid. The storage solution is meant to protect your probe from drying out during storage and shipping. Your probe simply needs to be conditioned to prepare it for use. To condition the probe, use tap water...